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Link Popularity and Link Importance

Quite simply, your link popularity score is the total number of external sites that link to yours. Link importance is closely related to link popularity, but with a twist. It looks at the type of external link and assigns higher scores to high quality links.

Link importance helps filter out the spammers who set up dozens of free sites and then link their bogus sites to the main Web site. Spamming is such a problem that some search engines don't count free Web sites at all in their link popularity scores.

Some of the more complex search engine algorithms combine link popularity with link importance and use it to assign a weighted link popularity score. The weighted score looks at two things: the number of sites linked and the relative importance of those sites. For instance, if CNN links to your site, that single link might count a lot more than 20 links from your friends' personal Web pages.

Check Your Link Popularity Score

Your link popularity score is a relatively objective measurement and you can check that with several search engines. However, there's no single way to predict what your weighted link popularity score is because each search engine uses a different algorithm to determine it.

NetMechanic made checking link popularity easier when we recently added a Link Popularity measurement to the Page Primer results section of our Search Engine Power Pack tool.

Remember that numbers will vary between search engines because they all query from different databases.

How Does It Affect Your Rank?

Your link popularity score alone won't determine your rank, but search engines increasingly use it to score pages because they consider it a sign of a high quality site. As Google co-founder Sergey Brin explains: "external approval raises a page's ranking."

That makes sense if you think about it: one site won't link to another site for no reason, so a site with a lot of external links must contain valuable content.

All search engines use different algorithms to rank sites, but most of the major ones consider link popularity in some form. Google uses link popularity almost exclusively to rank sites.

Google also recently partnered with Yahoo to provide secondary results for Yahoo's Web directory, so a high ranking in Google may help you in Yahoo as well. (To see secondary results in Yahoo, enter your search term, then click on the Web Pages selection on the top toolbar.) Most other major search engines also factor popularity into their algorithms.

Lots of links to your site can also improve your search engine ranking by keeping you in the search engines. As more sites link to you, the odds increase that search engine spiders will encounter your site regularly and be less likely to drop it from their databases.

Improving Your Link Popularity

The downside of link popularity as a ranking tool is that it penalizes new sites. Even if you have a terrific site stuffed with valuable content, it still takes time to publicize your site and collect links.

Don't wait for other webmasters to find you! Instead, search the Internet to find sites related to yours and compile a list of sites likely to be interested in linking to your site. For instance, a local land conservation group might put together a list like this: state and local hunting organizations; other environmental groups in the area; as well as city and county informational Web site pages.

Now spend some time networking:Email the webmaster of each site and briefly explain how a link to your site could benefit their visitors. Make this a personal appeal; don't send a general form letter because that is likely to be deleted at once.
Offer to trade links: include a link to them on your site first and include the appropriate URL in your message.
Suggest the section of their site where a link to yours would be appropriate.
Make it easy for them to link to you by including the necessary HTML code in your email.

Link Exchange Services

While you network, consider registering with a link exchange service to quickly generate more links pointing to your site. Their operation is simple. You register your site with the service and the service adds you to the links page that other members place on their Web sites. Some services promise to add as many as 500 links pointing to your Web site within 30 days.

Most link exchange services are free, but almost all impose some restrictions on their members. The most common are:You must display a specific icon on your home page that points to the links page on your site.
You must upload the updated links page to your site periodically (usually every 30 days) or be dropped from the service.
You have to agree to submit your site (including the links page) to search engines on a regular basis.

Before you register with a service, carefully study its rules and regulations to make sure your site is eligible (some don't accept adult sites, for instance). Also check to make sure that the links are relevant to your site content. Some search engines are beginning to penalize so-called "link farms" that don't add any value to a site.

In The Meantime

Both networking and link exchange can take time to show benefits. While you wait, focus on optimizing your page for search engines. Most still rely mainly on your HTML code and page content to rank your site. Common techniques like TITLE and META tags make your site attractive to the search engine algorithms and help boost your ranking even before you get many external links.
Page Primer will analyze your page and help you optimize your page to appeal to the individual search engines' algorithms.

Anchor text link

The calculation of link relevance is an important factor when identifying the theme of a web site, in which both navigation and incoming references play a huge role. The broad relevancy communicated towards the Google Index consists of the themes of individual pages, which are connected by their relevancy network and shape the overall image of the web site. While the topic is of course set by the actual content of the page, the level of its relevance builds with off-site and off-page references as well. If any web page is often linked to with anchor texts that successfully emphasize its theme, the words and derivations with which it is referred to become the phrases it is seen most relevant to. Thus both website navigation and inbound links carry votes, and not only for the used expression, but also for the entire theme, even for words with similar meaning that are not directly targeted. This is of course if the web page itself is relevant to these phrases. In case the terms used to point to the web page can not be found in its title and/or content, nor do they have any relation to its theme, the votes carry much less weight or are sometimes even discarded. Misuse of this practice is thus easy to identify. Also the number of references may not put as much weight into emphasizing the theme as the quality of the links pointing to the resource. Hundreds or thousands of links from less trusted, less important sources aren't likely to match up to the weight of a single referring link from a well trusted, quality web site.

 

Case 1:
If the anchor text is irrelevant to the source and/or the target page, the link will most likely be ignored altogether, or only pass a single vote for the exact phrase. If a page does not rank at all for phrases that are otherwise relevant to its topic, even though the web site is well referenced from other sources, either the incoming links or the internal navigation anchor text is flawed in its attempt to carry the theme throughout the web site and will rank significantly lower than other URLs.

+ Resolution: The anchor text used to point to a page is matched to the title and the content of both the source and the target during relevancy calculations. While there's little chance of a penalty if either are off-topic, a proper anchor text and title is one of the most important initial signals to users who are yet to arrive to the page or web site. The theme should be clearly defined by the wording and be consistent in all three, allowing people to determine if it is the resource they need, whether they encounter a link on another web site, or the page title and description on Google Search results. Should any of the three exclude the keyphrase(s) of the resource, it will become hard for both users and bots to determine the exact theme, and thus the URLs will show much lower positions for the given queries even without a penalty. Also, while it is an evidence, and natural to have diverse wording of anchor text from referring sources, the title and the anchor text of the website navigation are both often used by people when creating a link. Thus again, choosing the proper, most descriptive phrases that match the content may be necessary to avoid lower than predicted position on the results pages.

Case 2:
Receiving links, or requesting others to reference pages with always the same anchor text will raise the question on how much control the web site had over the wording of its own "votes". If the profile shows a pattern that is the same as of sites trying to manipulate their rankings, this may raise a penalty once the same-anchor text link instances pass the natural threshold. Repeated misuse or overuse of such methods would lead to page-based penalties as opposed to phrase based, or even being banned from the Google index. Years of studies have shown a highly predictable pattern of "natural" linking in regards of anchor link texts used. Sometimes however, a page would accumulate a lot of references with the exact same anchor text by chance, enough to outweigh anything else in its linking profile.

+ Resolution: Reasons may be very simple, from not having a long enough title ( which people often use for anchor text ) to not having a description that others could paraphrase. While it is important to define the exact topic and role of a page ( and it is recommended to use consistent anchor text in the main navigation of a web site itself ), in cases of repetitive anchor text in inbound links, a signal is sent that the site is receiving manipulated "votes" to boost its relevancy. This is especially in the event when the branding targets a highly competitive term, which is often used by spammers and may be seen as manipulative. If a page has passed the natural threshold, and is now considered to have been excessively linked to with the same phrase from other domains, a penalty for this term is applied, forcing the URL to a lower position on the results pages. While the system can tell with a very good chance when such practices are in place, sometimes even natural linking patterns will show these signals. However, this penalty is automatic, and may only affect the given query and URL. If the page gets references from other domains with other phrases in the anchor text as well, the penalty may then be lifted. For this you may revisit and extend page titles and descriptions ( should they have been too short ), or provide some indirect ideas to visitors on how to describe / define the theme of the site.

Case 3:
Keyword stuffing, while an unofficial term, clearly describes a past spamming method of which now has a proper counter measure in the system of Google. Using improper length or irrelevant phrases in anchor text when pointing to an internal page may trigger the applying of a filter, and lower the rankings of the URL for searches that include the used words. Continued misuse of anchor text may also lead to the excluding of the URL(s) from the Index, including the source and target pages as well. Recent additions to spam filtering now examine the relevancy of the target page closely, and in certain cases highly competitive commercial terms included in the anchor text, but to a page that is not relevant to them, may be seen as manipulative.

+ Resolution: Accidental overuse of anchor text can easily be avoided by judging a text link, or text link navigation by its aesthetics. Two or even three word links are not at all uncommon, while an entire paragraph of words being used as the text for a link is obviously not meant for better user experience. Avoid stuffing too many keywords into a link, both for your internal navigation, and incoming links from other web sites. Again, any pattern that could be identified as not "natural", is easy to spot for anyone, thus you should assume that Googlebot and the Google algorithms can just as easily judge these cases with a very good accuracy.

Case 4:
A newly issued spam detection system, that has been created to battle off scraper sites, links purchased for their parameters ( PageRank ), spam and other manipulative attempts, now examines the relevancy of any given page with a complex, phrase-matching method. This patent involves predicting the number of only marginally related, competitive phrases present in a document for any given theme. Its effects in combination of other closely examined factors may affect websites that have been ranking well for certain phrases so far. The Google algorithm also looks for attempts to artificially create relevance from semantic correlation if the topic of the page would not indicate the presence of certain references ( yet is including them ). Should a page, by accident, pass the threshold of a natural number of related highly competitive phrases that are not supported by its off-page signals ( inbound links, relevant internal pages referencing it with just as relevant anchor text ), or should a page use an excessive amount of thematically unrelated, but semantically similar terms, it may receive a very distinct penalty ( dubbed by the webmaster community as the last page or -950 penalty ) for the exact queries it was assumed targeting. The pages would stop ranking for a phrase, in case they have a distinctly high TrustRank, they may take the very last positions shown for the given query, but may still have good positions for others. Also, as fluctuations within the system can indicate borderline cases of mixed problems, these URLs may be shown in their original, or better than original rankings for a period of time. Examples include when a page would have strong relevance signals for a two word keyphrase, and is seen attempting to create relevance ( links or content for topics that by themselves are seen as a separate theme ) by using other two word keyphrases that utilize a single part of the one it ranks for. A different case is when a page unknowingly passes the threshold of a "natural" number of references to highly competitive terms, and while human editorial opinion may conclude the topics to be related, automated examinations show similarities with manipulative attempts.

+ Resolution: This penalty is tied to relevancy, thus is often an indication of the lack of proper signals. It is applied automatically and thus any legitimate page can overcome its effects by gaining new outside references to justify the theme, or by using a clearly relevant wording in the title and anchor text pointing to the page. Also, this filter is likely to be adjusted in the upcoming period, to be more accurate in detecting spam documents. You may want to examine the theme hierarchy of your website by making sure the given page is referenced from already relevant pages within the website, and the navigation is using a relevant anchor text as well. Keep in mind that too broad or on the other hand, too specific keyphrases may send the signals of targeting a different theme than the page would be a match for. Single word anchor text may be too generic in certain cases ( and along other single word anchor text with different themes ), and uncommon derivations are not always recognized by the Google algorithm as a match for the topic. Read more on Website Navigation.

Finding Hidden Links

 

Blaues-Haus-Duesseldorf.de is a classical case of hidden links to fool search engines; the HTML defines a background color of “#F7F0FB” and a font color of “#F7F0FB”, thus rendering a keyword-stuffed text in the footer area invisible.

Now why does Google not simply find methods to ban such tricks? The site is older by now, classical SEO spam that’s been at the same location last year, as Siggi Becker tells me, and still has a PageRank of 3 (and surely, it’s not a special case, but one of many). Is it because to understand which text is showing on the page, or might be showing on the page, you need a layout rendering engine which understands CSS, deprecated inline HTML styles, JavaScript... and maybe even a bit of “human” common sense to understand realistic modes of user behavior?

After all, a page using a dynamic navigation menu that opens on mouse hovers also “hides” links, albeit in a way that you won’t think of as fishy. Even static text that may be printed in the background color of a page might be positioned on top of a background image of different colors in a way that it becomes visible again; and maybe its positioning is dependent on an exotic CSS hack that happens to display correctly on typical browser, but isn’t valid according to the W3C rulebook.

Thus, for Google or other search engines to truly understand which text is hidden for the wrong reasons, they’d have to do a lot more than compare background colors with font colors... thanks to DHTML, they even have to do a lot more then generating a screenshot of the site using e.g. a Mozilla rendering engine and then applying OCR (even though this procedure would likely already be much too time-consuming). And even if they’d be able to write code that generates all possible dynamic versions of a page to check which links can be actually reached, and which can’t, who’s to say (except an advanced, “common sense” AI) that the dynamic menus are not simply positioned in places where normal users won’t ever hover over them?

Is there any way in which Google and others can truly differentiate a spam link from a normal link? It’s hard to tell. It might be more realistic that Google’s algorithms assigns negative “spam points” to every action used within the HTML, CSS and so on. It’s as fuzzy as it’s pragmatic: three negative points might be assigned for a page that has the same font color as background color. Another point if text is using a tiny font size. Another point for every keyword in the title that exceeds a dozen keywords. Another point for every non-nofollowed link pointing to a shady neighborhood. Another point if there’s a meta redirect in the page. Another point if you’ve got duplicate content. Another 0.1 point for every keyword repetition inside the text, and so on. Now while every point assigned (taken on its own) may be assigned for a harmless reason that has a non-spammy explanation, chances are that when you cross a threshold of -N points, your page is indeed spam, and can then be automatically banned. (Positive points on the other hand might be assigned for such things as having backlinks/ having a high PR, to make sure that a site like CNN that’s linked from all over the place does not suddenly drop into googleaxed oblivion).

Google, on the other hand – to protect their anti-spam algos from spammers in particular – is not likely to share with us what’s really happening behind the scenes... though, whatever it is, we do see that it’s not working in all cases.

 

 

Search, Engines, Engine, Optimization Services

  1. Web site technical optimization
  2. Web site keyword report (category - search terms) technical support (via software)
  3. Web site Meta-Tag rearrangement  technical support ( via 2005 version software automatically)
  4. Web site Meta-Link (In-Autbond) report and optimization support (by enterprise version guarantee)
  5. Web site Spider-Link optimization ( 2005 version software)
  6. Web site Rating report (without submission software by 2005 version)
  7. Web site popular search terms traffic analysis. ( This six differenr works do by 2005 version softwares professionaly)
  8. Automatical submission by Enterprise 2005 version 3 different softwares. (with standart and pro version can be submited just 10 web sites)

 

Pro-submission and Eco-submission comparison

  1. Professional pack supports more categories
  2. Pro-pack supports top10 position in 6 months eco is for 12 months
  3. Pro-pack indexes each pages seperately 
  4. Pro-pack supports meta and spider-link optimization
  5. Pro-pack supports rating page and queu saving.










In Same time you can check your website in couple search engines

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Directories
Yahoo
DMOZ
Snap

Search Engines
Alta Vista
Direct Hit
Lycos
Excite

Webcrawler
Go.com
DejaNews
Google
Meta Searches
Go2Net
Search.Com
Mamma
DogPile

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